Cutting the Padlock

News & Strategies for Storage Auctions Success

Posted on by Matt Nannis


electronicsWhen was the last time that you purchased a new smart phone, tablet, MP3 player, laptop, desktop, or television....

Was it this year? In the past few months or even the past few weeks? Maybe you got a new gadget at the beginning of the year and then the new model was released, making your phone yesterday's news. So of course, your phone starts to look like an outdated junker to you and you have decided to trade up. All these trade-ins and trade-ups eventually lead to much e-waste.

As a storage auction hunter, this problem multiplies for you as you are constantly stumbling across electronics in storage unit auctions. So what do you do with all the items that you win and don't have interest in keeping?

Sell Electronics

Many electronic items that you find inside storage units may be suitable for resale depending on the age and condition of the item. Fairly new items can often be sold on ebay, craigslist and flea markets or yard sale for depreciated amounts. Even items that are older may still find buyers at drastically reduced prices.

Some items may be more valuable because of their age, such as antique phonographs or even early model gaming consoles from the 80's can sometimes be sold for more money than you'd imagine based on their audiences penchant for collecting.

Upcycle

What you can't sell as is, you may be able to upcycle with a bit of creativity and elbow grease.  Old electronics can have surprising uses with a bit of imagination. Take apart that old keyboard and use the keys to cover a picture frame. Or take that old console television, and dismantle the screen, add some fabric, and you've got yourself a clever animal bed, aren't they more entertaining than your television after all? Old records can be compiled into vibrant wall art. Almost any old electronic has parts that can be used to create something new, even if that means disassembling the item for parts.  Your creations can then be resold as repurposed merchandise, or you can keep all the spoils for yourself, to show off your crafty DIY side.

E-Cycle and Donating

ecycle

If you're less inclined to take on a new DIY Project and you've failed to sell your electronics, what is the next step?

While you may have failed to sell the item, they may still have interested buyers that you just don't know. Sometimes, it is more time and cost efficient to simply donate these items to charity, allowing someone beyond your customer base to purchase the item, and allowing you a tax write off. This scenario is win-win.

But perhaps, you've tested these old electronics and found that they are no longer functional. You could donate them to charity, but they'd end up being throw away. Instead, you should ensure that your items are being disposed of properly. Simply throwing the items away is a bad idea. All electronic scrap components may contain contaminants such as lead, cadmium, beryllium, or brominated flame retadants, which can be detrimental to the environment when they are taken to the dump, and then begin to decompose over time and these contaminants begin to leak into the ground and water supply.

Instead, e-recycle your items! When you e-recycle, you are turning your electronics into an organization or business that will refurbish the old devices for reuse. These devices are then often donated to non-profit organizations, schools, or low income communities, or sometimes resold.

In many places around the country, there are drop off locations for your old electronics. For example, in the Asheville Mall where the Storage Unit Auction List headquarters are located, there is a drop off location for cell phones right in the middle of the food court. Check in your area to find out what organizations participate in this type of e-cyling program and where you can go to drop off your old electronics!

Posted on by Matt Nannis | Posted in Storage Auction Tips, Updates | Tagged , ,


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About Matt Nannis

Matt is the content provider at StorageUnitAuctionList.com. He's going to keep you all up to date and informed!

  • Vince

    In Southeastern Wisconsin you could call VSL Effect Computer Recycling at 414.852.0944. They will recycle your electronics for free. Or go to their website at http://www.vsleffect-recycling.com and schedule a pick up.

  • Thanks for the tip Vince!

  • Tim and Marie

    Ebay.. Cell phones- get a collection of any amount and post on ebay we sold a lot of 20 for 25.00 plus 9.00 shipping cost.. Cell phones have gold recovery in them. Also computers, the intell processor/mother board/memory card are used in scrape gold recovery, also on ebay.. check it out and make more money.. Remove all cords and copper wireing- most recycling centers buy these at a lower price if not cleaned, but still a way to recover more money. The case and other parts on the computers is scrape metal, we make $200-$400 extra every month is scrape metals, and only buying 1-2 unts a week till we get bigger..

  • Eric Ruszkowski

    ALL items have a value, including old electronics. Is it worth your time for the money you will receive in return? Old computers can be dissassembled for gold content, old monitors/TVs for copper, etc. Alot of labor goes into extracting the metal to salvage.
    I would recommend doing a quick search on ebay/online for similar items. If previous sales are at a dollar amount you are interested in – list it. Otherwise recycle…
    Good Luck!

  • Thanks Tim and Marie! It is always great to hear practical tips and tricks from our readers!

  • Hey Eric, great advice. Thanks!

  • Eric Ruszkowski

    Don’t forget donation centers! Not everything is TRASH. Not everything is TREASURE. For those things in the middle, donating may be the answer. If you have larger items and no space, or the items may just not be high enough quality to warrent re-sale, donate them and get the tax write off. Use a list from their sites to determine fair market value for your donations and bring in the slips they give to you when submitting. Helps offset the cost even more.

  • Beth Adams

    Thanks for the information about the
    auctions very helpful.

  • Thanks Beth!